Tuesday September 16 2014
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In pediatric sports medicine almost half of all injuries are due to overuse. This can be especially true in baseball. As kids train year-round for sports, now is a good time to prepare for this summer sport.

Q: My 11-year-old son is a pitcher on his baseball team. I’ve read about the rise in “Little League elbow.” How can my son keep his throwing arm healthy?

07/08/2013 - 14:31
KidSports Staff
As the summer comes to an end so do summer baseball leagues. The problem with this is that many kids want to continue playing baseball, but do not want to wait until next spring. For those kids who would like to continue playing ball, parents should look at fall ball leagues.

Fall ball leagues are available for most age levels, starting at about age 8 and going to 15 or 16. These leagues are a great way for kids to stay involved and hone their baseball skills.

10/17/2011 - 13:52
Greg Zimmer
Thanks to relatively new technology, the most physically demanding position on the diamond—catcher—has gotten easier. A product called knee savers, which attaches to your shin guards, is a stress-relieving accessory that reduces the erosion of cartilage on the knee joints and provides support, protection and comfort.

University of Pittsburgh catcher Kevan Smith estimates that more than 50 percent of big-league catchers—including Twins superstar Joe...

07/10/2011 - 15:46
Walter Villa
Throwing a baseball too many times, too often, or throwing the wrong types of pitches can predispose a child-athlete to elbow and shoulder injuries.

Baseball is not traditionally considered a dangerous sport. However, what we are finding is that parents are pushing their kids harder.

07/10/2011 - 15:31
D.J. Phillips MD
The position of catcher is one that slowly begins to reveal its importance the longer your child plays the game of baseball.

There is not even a need for a catcher in T-ball, and in machine-pitch leagues the main purpose of the position is simply to get a kid used to wearing the chest protector, knee guards and mask –...

07/10/2011 - 15:27
PSR Staff
Switch hitting is an aspect of baseball that not many athletes have the skills to become proficient at. Starting out is the hardest part of switch hitting. For many hitters, batting from the opposite side can bring out frustration and anger.

If you think your child has the ability to become a switch hitter, here is some advice. Listen to your kids; if they want to try, let them. Make sure to take it slow, though.

06/16/2011 - 10:35
PSR Staff
The “Dog Days of Summer” can take a toll on a lot of things: the lawn, the air conditioning bill, the Pirates’ chances at a .500 season. And often times, your child’s success on the baseball or softball diamond.

As summer rolls on and the Little League seasons turns into a Rec-League season, it’s not uncommon for kids’ to experience slumps,...

05/26/2011 - 14:55
PSR Staff
Buying spikes for growing kids can seem like a losing battle. Your son or daughter needs them for their baseball or softball season, you spend your hard-earned dollars on a good pair, and mere months later, they go in the basement till next season.

By then, they will inevitably be too small, and you start the whole process over again.

For a family with two, three or more sports-playing siblings, the dollars start to add up....

04/20/2011 - 12:44
Tony DeFazio
When considering the normal itinerary for the average Little League baseball practice, there seems to be one over-riding conclusion: Don’t confuse activity with accomplishment. Unfortunately, it’s a reality that many a Little League practice has become way too ho-hum.

Standard-issue youth baseball practice has become exhausted. Normally, when kids arrive at practice they are enthusiastic. Then practice begins. Each batter gets 15-20 pitches, next batter.

04/19/2011 - 15:01
PSR Staff
Spring training has started and baseball tryouts are right around the corner. Here are some tips for your first tryout, whether you are preparing for your first kid-pitch league, your first school team or everything in between.

Take it seriously.
Be on time. Actually, be early, Arrive 10-15 before the assigned time.

03/23/2011 - 15:44
Tony DeFazio